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GA TWS Early Career Award in Honor of Dr. Bob Warren

Dr. Robert J. “Bob” Warren, a retired professor of wildlife ecology and management at the University of Georgia Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, and a member of The Wildlife Society for 43 years, has dedicated his career to guiding students into successful wildlife careers. In order to honor Dr. Warren and his commitment, the Georgia Chapter of The Wildlife Society established an award in 2017 in his name, to present to an Early Career Professional. GA TWS will accept nominations annually and award one Early Career Award at our annual fall meeting, as candidates arise.

To be eligible for the award, the Nominees must have:

  1. Graduated with BS or MS within the past 10 years
  2. Be 40 years old or younger
  3. Demonstrated success while working as a wildlife professional in any agency, organization, or the private sector for at least 3 years
  4. Be a member of both The Wildlife Society and Georgia Chapter of The Wildlife Society
  5. Demonstrated commitment to and involvement in TWS at the state, regional, and/or national levels
  6. Have their AWB or CWB certification
  7. Demonstrated commitment to mentoring students/rising professionals

Submit nominations to Andrew Edelman at aedelman@westga.edu by January 21, 2022 and include:

  1. A cover letter identifying the nominee and describing the work for which he/she is
    being nominated (1 page)
  2. A short CV/biography (1 to 5 pages) of the nominee
  3. Additional support letters, if applicable

Award winners will be selected by the GA TWS Executive Board.

2018 Recipient – Krisha Whiting

Krisha Whiting was the first recipient of the GA TWS Early Career Award in Honor of Dr. Bob Warren, which was inspired by Dr. Bob Warren and his dedication to mentoring students. Krisha earned a Bachelor’s of Science from Western Carolina University with a concentration on forest resources and a Master’s of Natural Resources from the University of Georgia Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources. Among Krisha’s many academic achievements include Candidate Certified Forester® and Associate Wildlife Biologist® certifications.

Krisha has been an active member of The Wildlife Society for many years as a past-student chapter member, as well as a state and national chapter member. Her dedication to TWS includes serving on numerous working groups and committees, including Forestry & Wildlife, Spatial Ecology & Telemetry, Native Peoples Wildlife Management, Wildlife Damage Management, Early Career Professional, and the Special Recognition Award Committee. Krisha also served as the Georgia Chapter Legislative Representative & Conservation Affairs Network committee chair. Krisha was inducted into The Wildlife Society’s Leadership Institute class of 2016, an honor that only 10 young professionals are selected for nationwide each year. Krisha has exhibited amazing dedication and leadership to the Georgia Chapter of the Wildlife Society for many years and has mentored countless other young professionals.


GA TWS Jenkins-Crockford-Hayes Wildlife Conservation Award

This award is designed to be a later career award to honor the wildlife professionals who have made significant impacts over their careers across a variety of avenues, to include but not limited to, innovations in research and/or management techniques and contributions to students and professionals, across our state, region, and nation. Dr. James Hobart Jenkins 1919-2006, Jack A. Crockford 1923-2011, and Dr. Frank A. Hayes, 1921-1997, were well known for their contributions to wildlife conservation but are most famous for the Chap-Chur Gun and methodology, and its careering changing, innovative, still widely used method for live wildlife capture. All men were well-known, highly regarded, active in their respective societies, well awarded, and made significant impacts on wildlife in the state, region, and nation.

To eligible for this award, the Nominees must:

  1. Be 50 years old or older
  2. Have demonstrated success while working as a wildlife professional in any agency, organization, or the private sector for at least 15 years
  3. Be a member of both The Wildlife Society and Georgia Chapter of The Wildlife Society
  4. Made a significant impact on wildlife/wildlife management in Georgia. Regional and/or national reputation is a plus.

Submit nominations to Andrew Edelman at aedelman@westga.edu by January 21, 2022 and include:

  1. A cover letter identifying the nominee and describing the work for which he/she is being nominated (1 page)
  2. A short CV/biography (1 to 5 pages) of the nominee
  3. Two additional support letters

2019 Recipient – Dr. Karl Miller

Dr. Karl Miller’s wildlife conservation-related accomplishments span numerous areas, but especially noteworthy are those related to deer management and the effects of forest management practices on wildlife habitat. Perhaps more importantly, he has influenced a generation of wildlife professionals through his graduate and undergraduate mentoring.

Karl is recognized internationally as one of the leading researchers on white-tailed deer ecology and management. Under his leadership, the UGA Deer Lab has grown to be the leading white-tailed deer research group in the country. In addition to his work on white-tailed deer, Karl was a pioneer on the effects of intensive pine silviculture on wildlife habitat. He has worked with forest industry, the U.S.  Forest Service, state forestry commissions, NGOs and private landowners across the Southeast to understand how wildlife habitat and wildlife communities respond to forestry activities. Additionally, his expertise in forestry herbicide impacts on wildlife habitat has been sought by a variety of state and federal agencies, and forest industry. Although his research has had a profound influence in the scientific community, a more significant impact is in the translation of these research results into ‘on-the-ground’ management. He has given hundreds of continuing education presentations to professional biologists, hunters, landowners, and the general public based on his research. He also has led and participated in numerous short courses designed to train foresters and landowners on effective ways to enhance habitat for wildlife.

Even in light of his prestigious research career, Karl’s greatest legacy may be the accomplishments of the students he has taught and mentored. In his career he served as the advisor for 67 MS and 19 PhD students. His ability to successfully mentor young scientists is clearly evidenced by the success his students have experienced in their own careers. Furthermore, his instruction in the Wildlife Habitat Management and Senior Project classes in the Warnell School has provided practical training in natural resource management to hundreds of undergraduate students, many of whom went on to have successful careers in wildlife management or research.

In summary, few individuals have done as much to promote wildlife conservation in Georgia, the Southeast, and the nation over the past three decades. Karl has made immeasurable contributions through his research, outreach and training of future professionals.

2012 Recipient – Dr. Robert Warren

2011 Recipient – Dr. Ernest Provost