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GA TWS Early Career Award in Honor of Dr. Bob Warren

Dr. Robert J. “Bob” Warren, a retired professor of wildlife ecology and management at the University of Georgia Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, and a member of The Wildlife Society for 43 years, has dedicated his career to guiding students into successful wildlife careers. In order to honor Dr. Warren and his commitment, the Georgia Chapter of The Wildlife Society established an award in 2017 in his name, to present to an Early Career Professional. GA TWS will accept nominations annually and award one Early Career Award at our annual fall meeting, as candidates arise.

To be eligible for the award, the Nominees must have:

  1. Graduated with BS or MS within the past 10 years
  2. Be 40 years old or younger
  3. Demonstrated success while working as a wildlife professional in any agency, organization, or the private sector for at least 3 years
  4. Be a member of both The Wildlife Society and Georgia Chapter of The Wildlife Society
  5. Demonstrated commitment to and involvement in TWS at the state, regional, and/or national levels
  6. Have their AWB or CWB certification
  7. Demonstrated commitment to mentoring students/rising professionals

Submit nominations to Andrew Edelman at aedelman@westga.edu by January 21, 2022 and include:

  1. A cover letter identifying the nominee and describing the work for which he/she is
    being nominated (1 page)
  2. A short CV/biography (1 to 5 pages) of the nominee
  3. Additional support letters, if applicable

Award winners will be selected by the GA TWS Executive Board.

2022 Recipient – Swanny Evans

Swanny Evans graduated with his Master of Science degree in Wildlife Science from the University of Georgia in 2015. He currently serves as the GA TWS national representative to the Conservation Affairs Network and was a member of the TWS Leadership Institute class of 2018. Swanny is also a Certified Wildlife Biologist ®.

Swanny has become a leader in what is known as R3: the recruitment, retention, and reactivation of hunters. Hunting is a critical component of conservation and is supported by The Wildlife Society expressed through position statements and working groups. Swanny has created and implemented programs in Georgia that have become a nationwide standard in colleges and universities.The Academics Afield program introduces college students from nontraditional backgrounds to hunting and shooting sports. While he has developed these programs professionally, he is personally in the field with these new hunters teaching them the land ethic and providing mentorship. Swanny has shown exceptional leadership characteristics and skills early in his career that make him a very deserving recipient of this award.

2018 Recipient – Krisha Whiting


GA TWS Jenkins-Crockford-Hayes Wildlife Conservation Award

This award is designed to be a later career award to honor the wildlife professionals who have made significant impacts over their careers across a variety of avenues, to include but not limited to, innovations in research and/or management techniques and contributions to students and professionals, across our state, region, and nation. Dr. James Hobart Jenkins 1919-2006, Jack A. Crockford 1923-2011, and Dr. Frank A. Hayes, 1921-1997, were well known for their contributions to wildlife conservation but are most famous for the Chap-Chur Gun and methodology, and its careering changing, innovative, still widely used method for live wildlife capture. All men were well-known, highly regarded, active in their respective societies, well awarded, and made significant impacts on wildlife in the state, region, and nation.

To eligible for this award, the Nominees must:

  1. Be 50 years old or older
  2. Have demonstrated success while working as a wildlife professional in any agency, organization, or the private sector for at least 15 years
  3. Be a member of both The Wildlife Society and Georgia Chapter of The Wildlife Society
  4. Made a significant impact on wildlife/wildlife management in Georgia. Regional and/or national reputation is a plus.

Submit nominations to Andrew Edelman at aedelman@westga.edu by January 21, 2022 and include:

  1. A cover letter identifying the nominee and describing the work for which he/she is being nominated (1 page)
  2. A short CV/biography (1 to 5 pages) of the nominee
  3. Two additional support letters

2022 Recipient – John Jensen

John Jensen retired from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR) in 2019 after an exceptionally accomplished 23-year career as the lead herpetologist for the agency, though he continues to do biological surveys and research in the eastern US in his current role as a consultant. He holds two B.S degrees from Auburn University, in zoology and earth sciences. During his time with DNR, John coordinated the amphibian and reptile technical teams for the agency’s State Wildlife Action Plans, managed the Georgia Amphibian Monitoring Program, developed an instructional CD to teach frog calls to volunteer surveyors, contributed to the regional conservation strategy for the gopher tortoise, coordinated field surveys for rare herps, and served as lead editor of the book Amphibians and Reptiles of Georgia, which is the one-stop reference source for herpetologists in the state. He also served as a guest editor for Southeastern Naturalist. John also played a pivotal role in converting the long-time rattlesnake roundup in Claxton, Georgia, to a wildlife festival that focuses on herpetological education without sacrificing snakes.

In addition, John served as the co-chair of the Southeastern Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (SEPARC), co-chair and newsletter editor of the Gopher Tortoise Council (GTC), and member of the Conservation Committee for the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles. He has co-authored or authored over 150 chapters, technical reports, research papers, and species occurrence records in refereed journals.

Finally, John has been awarded the Alison Haskell Award for Excellence in Herpetofaunal Conservation by the Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (2015), the Lifetime Service Award by the Gopher Tortoise Council (2014), and the Partnerships Award by the United States Forest Service (2011). In summary, John Jensen has made an undeniable and significant impact to wildlife conservation through research and involvement with professionals and the community.

2019 Recipient – Dr. Karl Miller

2012 Recipient – Dr. Robert Warren

2011 Recipient – Dr. Ernest Provost