New Intern Joins TWS Operations Team

By Akea Cader

A picture of the large pond that surrounds Kinkaku-Ji, a Zen Buddhist temple located in Kyoto, Japan.
Image Courtesy of Akea Cader

This month, The Wildlife Society welcomes its first Operations and Outreach Intern to TWS Headquarters.

Akea Cader grew up in Newport News, Va. In May of 2020, she graduated from Virginia Tech with a Bachelor of Science degree in Fish and Wildlife Conservation and a minor in Japanese Studies. During college, Akea researched small mammals and their response to prescribed fire. She also volunteered as a field technician in a study on the parenting behaviors of song sparrows. As a Japanese Studies minor, she spent a semester abroad in Hirakata-shi, Osaka Prefecture, Japan where she was able to develop her cultural awareness skills and create lasting memories. Akea was an inclusive excellence fellow working to create a safe and inclusive environment for underrepresented students. She also spoke on a student panel for an inclusive pedagogy symposium at The Wildlife Society’s Annual Conference in 2018. Akea believes in the importance of creating a workplace where all people from diverse backgrounds feel welcomed and supported —making this internship a perfect fit for her. Akea is an amateur birder who also enjoys reading and learning new languages.

Akea will be helping to improve communication and engagement between TWS and organization units, develop and administer TWS’ professional development offerings, and lead diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives. Our team is very excited to work with her over the next six months.

Operations and Outreach Interns help to advance TWS organization unit services and professional development programs, as well as provide benefits to members, while gaining professional experience and expanding their network. Find out more about TWS organization units and professional development opportunities.

A photo of Akea Cader seated on the mosaic sculpture of Bell of Hortensia installed at Kobe Meriken Park, Port of Kobe, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Credit: Courtesy of Akea Cader


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