2020 TWS Elections: Vice presidential candidates

©TDuane Parker

The ballot for The Wildlife Society’s 2020 elections includes nominees for the position of vice president.

Additional nominees may be submitted by any voting member in good standing, if supported in writing by 5% of the voting membership. The deadline for additional nominations is May 15.

Electronic ballots will be sent June 1 to all members with an email address. Members without an email address will receive a paper ballot in the mail. Voting will close June 30. Mailed paper ballots must be postmarked on or before June 30. Newly elected council members are scheduled to be installed at the 27th Annual Conference, Sept. 27-Oct. 1, 2020, in Louisville, Kentucky.

The candidates’ statements expressing their vision for The Wildlife Society and their interest in running for this council position are below.

Nominees for Vice President

Art Rodgers

For more than 80 years, The Wildlife Society has been the preeminent organization for wildlife professionals across North America. Why? Because of people from all walks of life who are inspired by the beauty of the natural landscapes that surround us, curiosity about the wonders of the natural world and a desire to conserve our wildlife heritage. These are challenging times but TWS stands out as a beacon of hope, not just for conserving what we have but restoring what we have lost. Our members are on the front lines of conservation and management every day and they do everything they can to make the world a better place for all its inhabitants — humans and wildlife alike.

Having been actively involved with TWS at all levels, I have been inspired by our members and heard about their research interests and concerns. I have also heard their advice on how to better serve our membership and strengthen our professional organization. Following two terms on Council, I have gained a strong understanding of the administrative and financial accountability of those who serve, as well as TWS headquarters staff — they are all passionate, incredibly motivated and skilled. They provide the foundation that allows TWS to be the primary source of science-based information for management of our wildlife resources. They make it possible for TWS to ensure students and early career professionals have communication and networking opportunities that will provision them to conserve our wildlife heritage and strengthen our future membership.

To ensure our future, TWS needs to support our members and grow our membership, nationally and internationally, by providing leadership for science-based wildlife management, increasing communication and networking through our publications and conferences and by providing an inclusive environment for all who share our desire to make the world a better place.

See complete biographical sketch here.

Don Yasuda 

Assuming the leadership role in TWS is something that I’ve thought much about since I served as the Western Section Representative on TWS Council. During my time on Council I saw how an effective President could lead TWS by reflecting TWS’ history, understanding the present and visualizing the future. What I admired about Council and TWS were the TWS leaders who could see the best in each Council member and who could guide, encourage and challenge them to provide the best service to the Society. I have waited until I have gained a broad understanding of TWS and its members such that I now feel I can offer effective leadership to build on the historically strong leadership legacy of TWS as it continues to fulfill its mission.

My vision for TWS is to elevate its effectiveness to meet the needs of wildlife and people in the 21st century. Yet, I am committed to TWS remaining the preeminent professional society that emphasizes the importance of science-based wildlife management and conservation of biological diversity that is necessary for a diverse human society. To accomplish this, TWS must reflect and represent that human diversity. I know I can lead TWS in its quest to be more inclusive so our membership of wildlife professionals reflects society, which, in turn, will ensure that our views and positions on wildlife-related issues are contemporary and relevant.

If I earn the honor of serving TWS, I will be diligent that TWS remains financially sound, operationally effective, and focused on understanding member needs while encouraging the empowerment of all members to achieve their potential. I strongly believe that our collective strength will ensure that TWS continues to remain vibrant and relevant to its members, contributes to the sustainability of wildlife resources, and benefits society as a whole.

See complete biographical sketch here.


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