2020 TWS Elections: Northeast Section rep candidates

The ballot for The Wildlife Society’s 2020 elections includes nominees for the position of Northeast Section representative. ©sagesolar

The ballot for The Wildlife Society’s 2020 elections includes nominees for the position of Northeast Section representative. Click here to review a previous article on the nominees for TWS vice president. 

Additional nominees may be submitted by any voting member in good standing, if supported in writing by 5% of the voting membership. The deadline for additional nominations is May 15.

Electronic ballots will be sent June 1 to all members with an email address. Members without an email address will receive a paper ballot in the mail. Voting will close June 30. Mailed paper ballots must be postmarked on or before June 30. Newly elected council members are scheduled to be installed at the 27th Annual Conference, Sept. 27-Oct. 1, 2020, in Louisville, Kentucky.

The candidates’ statements expressing their vision for The Wildlife Society and their interest in running for this council position are below.

Nominees for Northeast Section Rep

Timothy Green

The Wildlife Society as an organization is more important than ever with impacts of climate change, invasive species impacting ecosystems, and changing attitudes of humans about the importance of wildlife and wildlife management techniques.  Training and supporting the next generation of wildlife managers to carry forward through all the changes is going to be critical for society. Management priorities and techniques will inevitably change, supporting the change with sound science will be important for the next generation. TWS has a long history of supporting the science, supporting management. Having the opportunity to help manage the Society would be quite an honor.

See complete biographical sketch here.

Valorie Titus 

I feel that the wildlife field is ever-changing. We are developing new techniques and technologies, and attracting a more diverse professional base. While still maintaining our rich history and culture as wildlife conservationists, we need to adapt to the changing world around us. We need to work to encourage and engage our young professionals (and students), and listen to their concerns and needs while expanding our professional development opportunities for all levels of the profession. Wildlife professionals need to take a strong stance on preserving and conserving our wildlife and wild lands so that future generations can learn and live better than we did. We need to strive as professionals to reach out to the public and our youth to continue the love of the outdoors and all it has to offer. It’s a challenge, in this time of technology, to express the importance of nature, but we are at a critical turning point ecologically. As a member of council, I will work to create ways to open up our field to a diversity of talents and strive to creatively support all the professionals in this field that want to make the world a better place for all.

See complete biographical sketch here.


Share your thoughts on this article, and others, on our Facebook and Twitter pages.