TWS renews position statements on energy and invasives

By Laura Bies

TWS Council recently approved revised position statements on energy development and invasive species. Credit: Bryan Nealy/BLM

The Wildlife Society Council recently renewed and updated two position statements that were due to expire later this year. Revised position statements on Energy Development and Wildlife and Invasive Species were recently posted on The Wildlife Society’s website.

A subcommittee of Council reviewed the position statements and recommended changes, incorporating input from several TWS working groups. Council then reviewed and approved the recommendations.

TWS’ position statements are broad and topical statements on wildlife issues that define the issue, contain factual background data, describe the most probable biological, social, and economics results of alternative actions, and may also contain a recommended course(s) of action. Position statements are part of TWS’ suite of policy engagement documents that cover a wide range of topics relevant to wildlife management and conservation policy.

In accordance with the Council-approved process for TWS policy engagement documents, TWS position statements are reviewed and revised every five years to ensure that they remain topical and relevant.

Energy Development and Wildlife

Energy development is growing to meet society’s mounting energy needs. All forms of energy development can affect wildlife and wildlife habitat. The Wildlife Society acknowledges that world-wide energy demands will continue to increase, and energy use is an integral part of our daily lives. Nonetheless, The Wildlife Society seeks to minimize adverse impacts of energy development on wildlife populations and their habitat and connectivity

Read the full revised position statement on Energy Development and Wildlife.

Wildlife and Invasive Species

Invasive species present unique challenges for wildlife management. The Wildlife Society defines an invasive species as a plant or animal species (including feral species) that is nonnative, whose introduction to a novel area was facilitated by humans, and that causes or is likely to cause ecological or economic harm.

Read the full revised position statement on Invasive Species.

Laura BiesLaura Bies is a government relations contractor and freelance writer for The Wildlife Society. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science and a law degree from George Washington University. Laura has worked with The Wildlife Society since 2005. Read more of Laura's articles.

Share your thoughts on this article, and others, on our Facebook and Twitter pages.