Camera network could offer snapshot of world wildlife

A group of biologists is calling for a network of remote cameras to share images of animal behavior around the world. Sixteen authors published a paper published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment calling for an expansion of remote cameras ­­— or camera traps — and a standardized system to share data from them. “There is a pressing need for increased coordination of remote-camera surveys to effectively monitor global biodiversity,” they wrote. The paper stemmed from a workshop at a 2014 meeting of the Society for Conservation Biology in Missoula, Mont., said TWS member Robin Steenweg, the lead author of the paper. The workshop brought together biologists who were working on networks of remote cameras to discuss their experiences. Those networks included Parks Canada, which deploys hundreds of remote cameras throughout its nine national parks; the Smithsonian’s eMammal project, which shares camera trap data from scientists and citizen scientists at sites around the world and Tropical Ecology and Monitoring Network, which gathers data from monitoring sites in 16 tropical forests in Africa, Asia and Latin America. “There are tens of thousands of cameras — probably hundreds of thousands — that are already collecting data,” Steenweg said. “We just need … Continue reading Camera network could offer snapshot of world wildlife